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Acknowledgement of Debt

This category contains 15 posts

Resulting trust arises in contractual vacuum

The bare facts of Chang v Lee can be summarised as follows: Ms Lee purchases a property in Sunnynook Mr Chang (Ms Lee’s uncle) advances Ms Lee $275,000 of the $566,000 purchase price The advance was not a gift The terms of the loan advance were incomplete Mr Chang made the advance to Ms Lee on the … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

One swallow does not a summer make

The expression “One swallow does not a summer make, nor one fine day; similarly one day or brief time of happiness does not make a person entirely happy” is attributed to Aristotle (384 – 322 BC). This proverb is perhaps apposite in the case of D v T. D (age 72) and T (age 59) … Continue reading

Gift or loan – that old chestnut …

This blog might just as easily be entitled “No-one ever said if only we hadn’t documented that loan agreement”.  Zhang and Li v Li relates to an advance of $335,500 from Ms Li’s parents to Ms Li and her husband. After Ms Li and her husband separated her position was that the advance was a … Continue reading

Trusts and puppies

When settling a trust it can be useful to consider what happens next.  In this regard the settlement of a trust can be likened to that moment in the pet shop where this adorable puppy all paws and nose and licky tongue and waggy tail and soulful eyes uses its artillery of cuteness to attack … Continue reading

Whose house is it?

The transfer of a family home to a trust is a relatively routine occurrence.  The general order of events is: settle trust execute agreement for sale and purchase carry out any  gifting get bank consent register transfer What happens if the last step does not occur? Has the sale in fact been effected?  Particularly in … Continue reading

The trustee did it

One of the stated purposes behind the proposed new Trusts Act (currently in the form of a draft bill) is to make trust law clearer and more accessible.  Laudable,  but is it realistic?  The naysayers need not go much further than the decision in NZ Natural Therapy Limited (in Liquidation) v Little.  A little bit of background … Continue reading

Taxation of Trusts ed 3

  The taxation of trusts is a dynamic and ever-changing landscape. The third edition of Taxation of Trusts published this week (September 2016) has been up-dated to incorporate recent case law developments and legislative amendments.  The text also considers the application of FATCA to trusts and proposed new reforms to the disclosure rules and closely … Continue reading

Emerging failure

Mr White established the Rex White Family Trust (the Trust) in 1992 to hold an inheritance he  received from his mother.  The trustees of the Trust were Mr Davis and the solicitor who prepared the trust deed, Mr McNiece (together the Trustees). Mr White’s wife was not aware of the trust at the time, although she had … Continue reading

Love lost

When who stopped loving who first is lost to the antiquities of time, for modern lovers there is still the trust to keep them shackled together. And what a shackle, and what expense… Whittle v Whittle is another tale of love lost but the Trust, if not the trust, remaining.  In this case the pesky … Continue reading