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Trusts

This category contains 171 posts

Exit stage left

Oldfield v Oldfield relates to the trust consequences of a marriage breakup.  Specifically, who should be the trustees when the settlors, who are also trustees, can no longer work together. Mrs Oldfield wishes to see Mr Oldfield removed as a trustee.  Mr Oldfield’s view is that it is not appropriate to replace the trustees, rather the … Continue reading

Saunders v Vautier 2019

The rule in Saunders v Vautier is generally well understood.  However, the parameters of the rule are less clear.  As noted in the Law Commission’s Third Issues Paper on the Review of the Law of Trusts “Perpetuities and the Revocation and Variation of Trusts”: The scope of the rule has become wider than merely allowing a … Continue reading

70% too late?

On first blush Kinney v Pardington appears to set the bar for Family Protection Act (FPA)claims at an almost unprecedented 70% in the context of one of three children claiming a breach of moral duty.  However, when the facts are considered, the context of this case, may set it apart due to the very specific … Continue reading

Ink vs litigation

On first glance Almond v Read, appears to have it all.  Arguments were made relating to the parties common intention, a constructive trust and breaches of fiduciary duty in the context of family owned land that was acquired with best of intentions.  However, over time, different parties adopted different views of the basis upon which a … Continue reading

Buyer’s remorse

Trusts can seem like a great idea.  And then one day a settlor can be confronted with the reality of the loss of control and cast around for someone to blame.  In addressing the realities of trust ownership, the exercise of powers of removal and appointment can offer a solution to issues with the dynamics between … Continue reading

Disclosure vs Discovery

Is a beneficiary more entitled to trust information pursuant to an application for discovery, rather than pursuant to a an application for disclosure? As a basic principle, courts do not permit discovery as a “fishing expedition.” However, as noted in Gavin v Powell at [41] “… the trustees’ obligations as to disclosure and a beneficiary’s right … Continue reading

Proper and reasonable

Until his removal in 2014 Toni Waho was a trustee of the Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust (the Trust), a trust that promotes the use and retention of Te Reo.  Me Waho was removed as a trustee on grounds that he had brought the Trust into disrepute by raising matters relating to the Trust and its … Continue reading

Beneficiary rights – never the twain shall meet

In Little v Howick Trustee DL Limited a beneficiary sought a review of trustee decisions and the removal of a court appointed trustee.  Perhaps surprisingly, considering the position taken in the Law Commission’s draft Trusts Bill and the Trusts Bill currently before Parliament regarding beneficiary rights,  Brewer J found that a discretionary beneficiary had no standing to seek a … Continue reading

Strangers and Beddoe orders

A Beddoe order (the name derives from the case Re Beddoe (Downes v Cottam))  is an order made by the court that permits trustees to incur expense on behalf of the trust filing or defending proceedings. A Beddoe order (if obtained) protects the trustees against claims by the beneficiaries that the action should not have been brought … Continue reading

S 182 update

The Court of Appeal has upheld the High Court decision in Thakurdas v Wadsworth that executors can bring proceedings under s 182 of the Family Proceedings Act. As noted at [16]: “We add that it is now settled law that s 182 serves an important purpose in relationship property litigation, allowing courts to address property … Continue reading

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