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breach of trust

This category contains 18 posts

Disclosure of legal advice

McCallum v McCallum relates to applications for discovery of information including trustee legal fees, trustee resolutions and legal advice received by trustees. The case considers important procedural aspects of when discovery can be sought, the rules that apply to originating applications and the extent of discretion available to the High Court regarding such matters.  Of … Continue reading

First up, best dressed

Representation of the Rawlinson & Hunter Trusts SA re Z Trusts relates to appeals against three judgments of the Jersey Royal Court regarding the equitable rights of a former trustee and whether those rights take priority over the rights of other claimants to the assets of a trust whose liabilities exceed its assets, in other words, … Continue reading

Buyer’s remorse

Trusts can seem like a great idea.  And then one day a settlor can be confronted with the reality of the loss of control and cast around for someone to blame.  In addressing the realities of trust ownership, the exercise of powers of removal and appointment can offer a solution to issues with the dynamics between … Continue reading

Beneficiary rights – never the twain shall meet

In Little v Howick Trustee DL Limited a beneficiary sought a review of trustee decisions and the removal of a court appointed trustee.  Perhaps surprisingly, considering the position taken in the Law Commission’s draft Trusts Bill and the Trusts Bill currently before Parliament regarding beneficiary rights,  Brewer J found that a discretionary beneficiary had no standing to seek a … Continue reading

Strangers and Beddoe orders

A Beddoe order (the name derives from the case Re Beddoe (Downes v Cottam))  is an order made by the court that permits trustees to incur expense on behalf of the trust filing or defending proceedings. A Beddoe order (if obtained) protects the trustees against claims by the beneficiaries that the action should not have been brought … Continue reading

Between a rock and a hard place

Mr Pratley was a Court appointed executor and trustee of two estates.  At the time of his appointment a 2-day hearing had already been set down to determine a claim against the prior executor and trustee.  The time-line is as follows: Mr Pratley’s appointment as executor and trustee – 20 October 2015 21 October 2015 Mr … Continue reading

The blessing of the court

Being a trustee is hard, and at times quite possibly boring (to paraphrase from the movie An Education: Emma Thompson and Carey Mulligan).  And worse, if you get it wrong the beneficiaries can sue you, no matter how hard a trustee might try to get it right. Fortunately, help is at hand in the form of … Continue reading

Trustees’ dilemma – how old is old enough to know?

The moral dimension of trusteeship arises in many contexts. The recent New Zealand court decisions concerning information obligations to beneficiaries, and the way this is dealt with in the new Trusts Bill, highlight the difficulty of judging what information is too much or too little to disclose. However, general principles on disclosure bypass the consideration … Continue reading

Protecting misdirected trust assets

Dr Love, was the Executive Chairman and a trustee of the Wellington Tenths Trust (the Trust). The Trust manages assets for the Maori people of the Wellington and Taranaki regions. The trustees of the Trust developed a “partnership” business model whereby the Trust  retained ownership of Trust land,  but that development was carried out by third party property developers.  … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

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