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GST

This category contains 5 posts

Trading Trusts

Transactions between GST-registered trusts and beneficiaries need careful scrutiny to ensure that GST obligations are not overlooked or obfuscated by the relationship between the trustee and the beneficiary. Although GST registration is in the name of the trust, the obligations fall to the trustees. For tax purposes a GST-registered trust and its beneficiaries are associated persons.  This means … Continue reading

Mistakes abound

CIR v Robertson relates to the recovery of GST paid by the Commissioner of Inland Revenue from the liquidator of corporate trustee Hukatere Coastal Trustees Limited (Hukatere) that received the GST in question. The case is a relevant reminder of the importance of recognising the corporate aspects of trustees and the risks to liquidators when … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

Amendment proposed to distinguish between personal and trustee capacity

  The High Court decisions, Concepts 124 Ltd v Commissioner of Inland Revenue [2014] NZHC 2140 and Staithes Drive Development Ltd v Commissioner of Inland Revenue [2015] NZHC 2593 have resulted in uncertainty surrounding the application of the voting interest test for corporate trustees .  See Corporate Trustee Associated for GST purposes In both cases, the … Continue reading

Assetless Corporate Trustees – commercial monstrosity?

Corporate trustees are a common feature of modern trading trusts.  The basic rationale is that the use of a company means that any liability that would otherwise accrue – say to a natural person trustee – accrues instead to the company and provided the directors do not breach the duties owed under the Companies Act … Continue reading