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Trust review

This category contains 14 posts

What’s left for the “spouse”?

The Property (Relationships) Act 1976 (the PRA) has primary jurisdiction over relationship property.   However, when there is a trust (or trusts) in the mix, the final division of property can  be complicated – and often neither side (nor the settlors or trustees who may be caught in the cross-fire) will consider the end result just … Continue reading

Highly unusual – or not?

In the Matter of the Representation of Scarlett Investment Holdings Limited addresses an application for rectification by a de facto trustee in circumstances where the settlor of three trusts settled by declarations of trust dated 23 February 1982 had died and the original trustee, a BVI private company was believed to have been struck off from … Continue reading

Beneficiary rights – never the twain shall meet

In Little v Howick Trustee DL Limited a beneficiary sought a review of trustee decisions and the removal of a court appointed trustee.  Perhaps surprisingly, considering the position taken in the Law Commission’s draft Trusts Bill and the Trusts Bill currently before Parliament regarding beneficiary rights,  Brewer J found that a discretionary beneficiary had no standing to seek a … Continue reading

The future of trust administration

The roles of trustees and trust administrators can be a rewarding but difficult role.  With the prospect of a Trusts Act in the foreseeable future (see Trusts Bill released 1 august 2017) trustees and trust administrators need to be match fit.  Increased reporting obligations under CRS, AML/CFT and FATCA are another matter for consideration. For … Continue reading

How afraid should we be of Clayton?

The Supreme Court decision in Clayton v Clayton changed the trust landscape.  But how afraid should we be?  Are all trusts vulnerable to Clayton-style challenge?  Or just the ones that push the envelope?  And, if the latter, how far can one push before there is a problem? A recent decision of Moore J has provided … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

Using enduring powers of attorney to exercise trustee powers

The issue of incapacitated trustees is not a new one.  Trustees continue to age and many do not retire when they can still elect to do so.  This leaves the issue of removing incapacitated trustees and transferring property held by them to continuing and new trustees. While it is generally accepted that an attorney under an … Continue reading

You aren’t my beneficiary – are you??

Certainty as to object, that is, who the beneficiaries of a trust are is one of the three certainties required to evidence a valid trust.  See Davis v White. However, what is the position where it is clear that a person or company or trust is a beneficiary – it is just that had the … Continue reading

Trustees lost at sea?

I often describe trusts to new clients by reference to puppies.  A lovely idea – and a very important life time companion.  However, trusts like puppies need a lot of support, maintenance and there needs to be someone to clean up. I was pleased then to see Lindsay Pope today analogising accepting an appointment as a trustee … Continue reading

Update on the Review of the Law of Trusts

A new “Trusts Reference Group” has been established by Minister of Justice Amy Adams to help update and improve the law governing private trusts. Ms Adams has stated that in a media release made on 29 May 2015 that “it’s important that trust law is fit for purpose and does not create unnecessary costs.” The Trusts Reference Group … Continue reading

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