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Wills

This category contains 33 posts

Capacity in context

Jellyman v Jellyman is about two children with different views as to what is in their mother’s best interests.  The matter came before the court because Mrs Jellyman was a trustee of a testamentary trust under her late husband’s will.  Her son Maurice was the other trustee. Mrs Jellyman wanted to sell her home in Hastings … Continue reading

Saunders v Vautier 2019

The rule in Saunders v Vautier is generally well understood.  However, the parameters of the rule are less clear.  As noted in the Law Commission’s Third Issues Paper on the Review of the Law of Trusts “Perpetuities and the Revocation and Variation of Trusts”: The scope of the rule has become wider than merely allowing a … Continue reading

Leave it in the sandpit

Central to the dispute in Roblin v Roblin is two brothers forced into co-trusteeship and co-ownership due to their joint appointment as executors and trustees of their mother’s estate.  The main asset of the estate is a property lived in by one brother and a number of unrelated parties, the terms of whose tenure was … Continue reading

70% too late?

On first blush Kinney v Pardington appears to set the bar for Family Protection Act (FPA)claims at an almost unprecedented 70% in the context of one of three children claiming a breach of moral duty.  However, when the facts are considered, the context of this case, may set it apart due to the very specific … Continue reading

S 182 update

The Court of Appeal has upheld the High Court decision in Thakurdas v Wadsworth that executors can bring proceedings under s 182 of the Family Proceedings Act. As noted at [16]: “We add that it is now settled law that s 182 serves an important purpose in relationship property litigation, allowing courts to address property … Continue reading

Costs bite when trustees fight

Trustees fall out, sometimes to the point where a working relationship is no longer possible. Applications to remove trustees are becoming an increasingly common occurrence. So, should trustees fight attempts to remove them? When is it appropriate to do so, and when not? And what are the potential consequences of misjudged opposition? The recent decision … Continue reading

Testamentary promise

Blended families can be complicated.  Sarah Ross’s father, Phillip New, left his entire estate to his partner of 40 years Maureen Dwight.  Sarah did not challenge her father’s will on the basis that his partner Maureen promised that provision would be made for Sarah by Maureen in Maureen’s will.  A will was prepared to this effect. … Continue reading

Generosity can have its limits

A grandfather, Mr Greenwood, told his grandson that he could buy his house for $300,000 after his death. He expressed this wish to others, including his daughter (mother of the grandson) who was one of the executors of his estate, although it was not in his 2005 will. This occurred in Christchurch before the Earthquakes … Continue reading

Finding the right way

Fox v Fox relates to a claim by an executor of the estate of Mrs Fox who required the assistance of the Court to conclude the administration of the estate by selling land and distributing the proceeds of sale according to a will. The executor’s impediment to doing so was that two of the properties … Continue reading

Trustee of digital assets

Certainty as to the subject matter of a trust is one of the three fundamental requirements as to a trust.  How digital assets are defined for trust purposes and generally is now an important asset and estate planning consideration. The explosive growth of social media, digital storage and internet passwords means that careful consideration needs to be given as … Continue reading

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