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appointment and removal of trustees

This category contains 9 posts

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

Who pays the piper?

When a trustee retires, it is necessary to transfer the trust’s assets from the trustees (including the retiring trustee) to the continuing and any new trustee.    Where a trustee is removed in contentious circumstances the trustee may be unwilling to assist in the transfer of trust property.  Sometimes with good reason – for example where … Continue reading

A sorry tale …

As noted in the judgment McLaren v McLaren at [1]  this case relates to “… a sorry tale of what can occur when a family adopts an inappropriate form of trust deed without adequate advice or sufficient understanding of the legal effect of its terms. In this case, a son who was given a power … Continue reading

The trustee did it

One of the stated purposes behind the proposed new Trusts Act (currently in the form of a draft bill) is to make trust law clearer and more accessible.  Laudable,  but is it realistic?  The naysayers need not go much further than the decision in NZ Natural Therapy Limited (in Liquidation) v Little.  A little bit of background … Continue reading

Taxation of Trusts ed 3

  The taxation of trusts is a dynamic and ever-changing landscape. The third edition of Taxation of Trusts published this week (September 2016) has been up-dated to incorporate recent case law developments and legislative amendments.  The text also considers the application of FATCA to trusts and proposed new reforms to the disclosure rules and closely … Continue reading

Emerging failure

Mr White established the Rex White Family Trust (the Trust) in 1992 to hold an inheritance he  received from his mother.  The trustees of the Trust were Mr Davis and the solicitor who prepared the trust deed, Mr McNiece (together the Trustees). Mr White’s wife was not aware of the trust at the time, although she had … Continue reading

Can a non-fiduciary owe fiduciary obligations?

In the Matter of the Piedmont Trust and the Riviera Trust powers of appointment and who can exercise them are an important aspect of both the management of a trust, and the very terms on which a trust is settled.  It is now generally agreed that  whether the powers are held by a trustee or a … Continue reading

Boys will be boys

When embarking on asset and estate planning, an important but often overlooked enquiry is as to how the next generation will manage the assets (and what those assets might be) and who sensibly should be in charge.  Consider the case of Frickleton v Frickleton. In this case one of four sons ends up as the sole executor … Continue reading

Protector powers – fiduciary or not?

While “protectors” are not a common feature of New Zealand trusts, they are not entirely unheard of.  A protector might be described as a hybrid of a trustee and an appointor.  This is a fairly inelegant statement of the term, but hopefully it gets the idea across.  The role of the protector developed in offshore jurisdictions where it was more … Continue reading