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appointment and removal of trustees

This category contains 22 posts

Two heads are not better than one

The facts of McAtamney v McAtamney are simple.Frank McAtamney was settlor and appointor of the Waimarie Second Family Trust. Notwithstanding that Frank’s late wife had no power of appointment, Frank and his wife twice purported to appoint new trustees.As set out at [11] and [12]:[11] Frank has now received legal advice that those deeds of … Continue reading

The sometimes slow business of administration

Ethel Moudale Uluakiahoia died intestate on or abut 5 January 1989 leaving 10 adult children, three of whom were some years later appointed administrators in 2008.  Following Mrs Uluakiahoia’s death different family members lived in the Estate’s sole asset, a residential property in Papatoetoe.  Eventually, agreement was reached that one of the administrators Ms Povey, … Continue reading

Harder than it looks

Vesting orders are commonly required for trusts and estates where one or more trustee has lost capacity and the assistance of the court is required to regularise property ownership.  While generally routine, each application depends on its own facts.  Lester AJ’s decision in Smith v Walsh is a good example of the nuances of incapacity and … Continue reading

Balance of convenience is best interest of beneficiaries

  The proceedings in McLaughlin v McLaughlin relate to a dispute between the beneficiaries and trustees of the Ashley Trust (the Trust) and whether there should be an interim injunction to prevent the trustees from proceeding with the next stage of a development of trust property. By way of background see A little light on Beddoe … Continue reading

More Remorse

Triezenberg v Mason (NO 3, recalled and reissued on 6 September 2019) chronicles the cost of a battle for the control of two family trusts.  In earlier decisions (see Loss of Morale and Buyer’s Remorse) Mr Mason was removed as a trustee of two trusts settled by him and his wife, and then later was stripped of his Appointor … Continue reading

Can attorneys exercise powers of appointment?

In Godfrey v McCormick Nation J held that an attorney under an enduring power of attorney can not exercise powers of appointment even if held in a personal capacity.  This is inconvenient where there is incapacity.  While this will likely be addressed by the trustee appointment and removal provisions in the Trusts Act 2019 (following … Continue reading

Loss of morale

Triezenberg v Mason (As to power and appointment and costs) follows the earlier trustee removal decision.  See Buyer’s remorse. By way of background the High Court removed Mr Mason and his incapacitated wife as trustees of two family trusts.  A rift had occurred between the competent trustees that had resulted in significant dysfunction.  No orders … Continue reading

Buyer’s remorse

Trusts can seem like a great idea.  And then one day a settlor can be confronted with the reality of the loss of control and cast around for someone to blame.  In addressing the realities of trust ownership, the exercise of powers of removal and appointment can offer a solution to issues with the dynamics between … Continue reading

Changing of the guard

It can be necessary to change trustees for many reasons. Regardless of the circumstances that require a change of trustee, the decision as to appropriate trustees can be complicated and requires a careful balancing of a range of considerations. The interim judgment in Thomson v Riley provides a useful insight into how a court balances … Continue reading

What do I want?

Bean v Bean is a an application to strike out a Family Protection Act 1955 (FPA) claim on the basis that it has no prospect of success.  The bar is set high for such a claim.  While any such claim will depend on its own facts, Bean v Bean is an interesting study of the procedural and tactical aspects … Continue reading

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