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Corporate trustee

This category contains 30 posts

Balance of convenience is best interest of beneficiaries

  The proceedings in McLaughlin v McLaughlin relate to a dispute between the beneficiaries and trustees of the Ashley Trust (the Trust) and whether there should be an interim injunction to prevent the trustees from proceeding with the next stage of a development of trust property. By way of background see A little light on Beddoe … Continue reading

Inherent jurisdiction at work

Santeater Limited v Wakelin highlights issues that can arise with the use of corporate trustees when the persons with the power to appoint and remove trustees are not able to work together. In this case the are two corporate trustees appointed to the Black Dog Trust (the Trust), one appointed by each settlor.  One of the … Continue reading

So close to Jasmine you can smell it

CDT 12 Limited v Millar doesn’t answer the Jasmine question, but does raise considerable doubt as to whether Jasmine applies in New Zealand.  For the background to the “Jasmine” issue, see Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not and Exit stage left. Mallon J’s decision on the papers in … Continue reading

Highly unusual – or not?

In the Matter of the Representation of Scarlett Investment Holdings Limited addresses an application for rectification by a de facto trustee in circumstances where the settlor of three trusts settled by declarations of trust dated 23 February 1982 had died and the original trustee, a BVI private company was believed to have been struck off from … Continue reading

Mistakes abound

CIR v Robertson relates to the recovery of GST paid by the Commissioner of Inland Revenue from the liquidator of corporate trustee Hukatere Coastal Trustees Limited (Hukatere) that received the GST in question. The case is a relevant reminder of the importance of recognising the corporate aspects of trustees and the risks to liquidators when … Continue reading

The curious story of the Angora cat

Para 438 in the decision of MezhProm Bank v Pugachev refers to a phenomenon in patent law known as the Angora cat problem first identified by Professor Franzosi, an eminent academic expert in the field: “Professor Mario Franzosi likens a patentee to an Angora cat. When validity is challenged, the patentee says his patent is … Continue reading

The future of trust administration

The roles of trustees and trust administrators can be a rewarding but difficult role.  With the prospect of a Trusts Act in the foreseeable future (see Trusts Bill released 1 august 2017) trustees and trust administrators need to be match fit.  Increased reporting obligations under CRS, AML/CFT and FATCA are another matter for consideration. For … Continue reading

How afraid should we be of Clayton?

The Supreme Court decision in Clayton v Clayton changed the trust landscape.  But how afraid should we be?  Are all trusts vulnerable to Clayton-style challenge?  Or just the ones that push the envelope?  And, if the latter, how far can one push before there is a problem? A recent decision of Moore J has provided … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

Assetless Corporate Trustees – commercial monstrosity?

Corporate trustees are a common feature of modern trading trusts.  The basic rationale is that the use of a company means that any liability that would otherwise accrue – say to a natural person trustee – accrues instead to the company and provided the directors do not breach the duties owed under the Companies Act … Continue reading

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