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Trustee retirement

This category contains 25 posts

Lost in translation

Orders removing trustees and appointing replacement trustees are not uncommon.  Such orders can be required in circumstances including incapacity, absence, deadlock or because it is expedient in the administration of the trust for a trustee to be removed and perhaps replaced.  However, it is important to appreciate that whether a trustee is removed / appointed … Continue reading

Rival contenders as trustee

Trainer v Leake involves a contest between “rival contenders as trustees of a religious trust.” Background The Hawkes Bay Revival Centre is a church founded in 1986. It is run under the auspices of the Hawkes Bay Revival Centre Trust, a trust established by Trust Deed to hold real and persona; property “for the benefit … Continue reading

It’s not a beauty parade

Trusts are commonly used for secession planning  providing, at least conceptually, for long-term asset ownership that will not be disrupted by death.  That’s the theory anyway.  However, the passage of time and the appointment and removal of trustees can mean that once harmonious relationships and arrangements are no longer so. The decision in Guest v … Continue reading

Removal of trustees

As noted in Van Boxel v Van Boxel at [4] “The application arises in what are familiar circumstances to this Court. The Trust owns a number of properties of which all three trustees are registered proprietors. Although Mr van Boxel holds enduring powers of attorney from his wife it is a matter of record that … Continue reading

Myths and liability

Trustees act personally.  As noted in the Supreme Court judgment in Macalister Todd Phillips Bodkins v AMP (emphasis added): “Liabilities incurred by a trustee in relation to a trust are always the personal liabilities of the trustee … A creditor has a personal right to sue a trustee and to get judgment and make the … Continue reading

Home is where the trust is?

The decision in Van Uden v CIR highlights the importance of recognising when a property owned by a trust can comprise a permanent place of abode.  The significance of a property being a permanent place of abode is that a person who is otherwise non-resident for tax purposes, will be treated as resident in New Zealand … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

Using enduring powers of attorney to exercise trustee powers

The issue of incapacitated trustees is not a new one.  Trustees continue to age and many do not retire when they can still elect to do so.  This leaves the issue of removing incapacitated trustees and transferring property held by them to continuing and new trustees. While it is generally accepted that an attorney under an … Continue reading

A sorry tale …

As noted in the judgment McLaren v McLaren at [1]  this case relates to “… a sorry tale of what can occur when a family adopts an inappropriate form of trust deed without adequate advice or sufficient understanding of the legal effect of its terms. In this case, a son who was given a power … Continue reading

Assetless Corporate Trustees – commercial monstrosity?

Corporate trustees are a common feature of modern trading trusts.  The basic rationale is that the use of a company means that any liability that would otherwise accrue – say to a natural person trustee – accrues instead to the company and provided the directors do not breach the duties owed under the Companies Act … Continue reading

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