//
archives

Settlors

This category contains 28 posts

Step carefully

The Trusts Act 2019 provides that before the creation of the trust, the adviser, must take reasonable steps to ensure that: the initial settlor is aware of the meaning and effect of the modification or exclusion of any default duties, and the settlor is aware of the meaning and effect of any liability exclusion or … Continue reading

Turning of the tide?

McGuire v Earl is a successful application for the following trust information: statements of accounts copies of all Minutes and Resolutions any documents pertaining to any distributions all documents pertaining to any gifting or debt incurred, and bank statements for all bank accounts. The trust in question was settled by Mr McGuire’s father and Mr … Continue reading

Memoranda of wishes

A nice idea or a reliable and permissible direction to trustees? Join Vicki Ammundsen to hear her views on memoranda of wishes:

Invalidity upheld

Webb v Webb relates to whether a tax debt owed by the former husband in New Zealand is enforceable in the Cook Islands, and what that means in the context of the division of matrimonial property in the Cook Islands; the validity of two trusts settled on somewhat unusual terms; and valuation considerations when a … Continue reading

Buyer’s remorse

Trusts can seem like a great idea.  And then one day a settlor can be confronted with the reality of the loss of control and cast around for someone to blame.  In addressing the realities of trust ownership, the exercise of powers of removal and appointment can offer a solution to issues with the dynamics between … Continue reading

More trustees sent to the naughty corner

Clement v Lucas concerns a family farming enterprise and illustrates the difficulties when beneficiaries cannot agree on how to give effect to the protections parents have put in place for the benefit of the beneficiaries. The contest at the heart of the matter was whether the trustees should distribute the trust assets equally between the … Continue reading

The curious story of the Angora cat

Para 438 in the decision of MezhProm Bank v Pugachev refers to a phenomenon in patent law known as the Angora cat problem first identified by Professor Franzosi, an eminent academic expert in the field: “Professor Mario Franzosi likens a patentee to an Angora cat. When validity is challenged, the patentee says his patent is … Continue reading

Disclosure request declined – 24 years a leap too far for a beneficiary who had already received 25%

This blog should be read together with the subsequent Court of Appeal decision.  See Rights to information prevail. As noted by Woolford J in para [1] Addleman v Lambie Trustee Limited relates to “an unfortunate dispute between sisters as to what level of disclosure is appropriate for the affairs of the Lambie Trust (the Trust)…” … Continue reading

Trustees’ dilemma – how old is old enough to know?

The moral dimension of trusteeship arises in many contexts. The recent New Zealand court decisions concerning information obligations to beneficiaries, and the way this is dealt with in the new Trusts Bill, highlight the difficulty of judging what information is too much or too little to disclose. However, general principles on disclosure bypass the consideration … Continue reading

Resulting trust arises in contractual vacuum

The bare facts of Chang v Lee can be summarised as follows: Ms Lee purchases a property in Sunnynook Mr Chang (Ms Lee’s uncle) advances Ms Lee $275,000 of the $566,000 purchase price The advance was not a gift The terms of the loan advance were incomplete Mr Chang made the advance to Ms Lee on the … Continue reading

Categories