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Removal of trustees

This category contains 44 posts

Proper and reasonable

Until his removal in 2014 Toni Waho was a trustee of the Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust (the Trust), a trust that promotes the use and retention of Te Reo.  Me Waho was removed as a trustee on grounds that he had brought the Trust into disrepute by raising matters relating to the Trust and its … Continue reading

Beneficiary rights – never the twain shall meet

In Little v Howick Trustee DL Limited a beneficiary sought a review of trustee decisions and the removal of a court appointed trustee.  Perhaps surprisingly, considering the position taken in the Law Commission’s draft Trusts Bill and the Trusts Bill currently before Parliament regarding beneficiary rights,  Brewer J found that a discretionary beneficiary had no standing to seek a … Continue reading

Lost in translation

Orders removing trustees and appointing replacement trustees are not uncommon.  Such orders can be required in circumstances including incapacity, absence, deadlock or because it is expedient in the administration of the trust for a trustee to be removed and perhaps replaced.  However, it is important to appreciate that whether a trustee is removed / appointed … Continue reading

Removal of trustees

As noted in Van Boxel v Van Boxel at [4] “The application arises in what are familiar circumstances to this Court. The Trust owns a number of properties of which all three trustees are registered proprietors. Although Mr van Boxel holds enduring powers of attorney from his wife it is a matter of record that … Continue reading

Myths and liability

Trustees act personally.  As noted in the Supreme Court judgment in Macalister Todd Phillips Bodkins v AMP (emphasis added): “Liabilities incurred by a trustee in relation to a trust are always the personal liabilities of the trustee … A creditor has a personal right to sue a trustee and to get judgment and make the … Continue reading

Protecting the trustee’s position on the changing of the guard

The decision in Meritus Trust Company Limited v Butterfield Trust, a decision of the Supreme Court of Bermuda, considers the practical matter of whether a removed trustee can retain sufficient trust assets against which to enforce its indemnity in relation to a contingent costs liability.  In this case the contingent costs liability was estimated at $5 million and … Continue reading

Home is where the trust is?

The decision in Van Uden v CIR highlights the importance of recognising when a property owned by a trust can comprise a permanent place of abode.  The significance of a property being a permanent place of abode is that a person who is otherwise non-resident for tax purposes, will be treated as resident in New Zealand … Continue reading

Family dispute ends in a subpoena too far

Some disputes have the plots of a war movie. Everything starts fine until the hostilities begin and everything gets messy. Sometimes this just leads to someone carrying out an attack that doesn’t make sense… The defendants in the case of Triezenberg and Dodd v Mason, Alexander and Wendy Mason, were married in 1959 and had three … Continue reading

How afraid should we be of Clayton?

The Supreme Court decision in Clayton v Clayton changed the trust landscape.  But how afraid should we be?  Are all trusts vulnerable to Clayton-style challenge?  Or just the ones that push the envelope?  And, if the latter, how far can one push before there is a problem? A recent decision of Moore J has provided … Continue reading

Two trustees go down to the woods … one is discharged, one is not

The use of corporate trustees is a common response to trustee liability.  However, where one of two natural person trustees retires and a corporate trustee is appointed, it is important to consider whether the retiring trustee has been discharged.  See ss 43, 45 and 46 of the Trustee Act 1956, which provide: Relevant Legislation 43 Power … Continue reading

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